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Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Meroufel, A., Gordon, A. & Thierry, D. (2024). Cathodic protection shielding of coated buried pipeline. Journal of Coatings Technology and Research, 21, 445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cathodic protection shielding of coated buried pipeline
2024 (English)In: Journal of Coatings Technology and Research, ISSN 1945-9645, Vol. 21, p. 445-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the 2000s, the concept of cathodic protection (CP) shielding was first raised in open literature and remains debated between coatings professionals. The mechanism of CP shielding, and its understanding continue to be studied for different coatings with different approaches and using various techniques. From the CP shielding factors to the assessment methods, the published literature merits a deep analysis to capture the established knowledge and identify the research gaps to further tackle the issue for reliable coated buried structures. A holistic approach to this topic seems necessary where coatings ageing, cathodic protection, electrochemistry, and transport processes should be considered. In the first part of the present review, the recent works related to the understanding of CP shielding, coatings properties were considered before discussing the mechanisms involved underneath coatings. Transport phenomena and their relationship with cathodic protection performance in the presence of chemical and microbiological processes are discussed in the second part. Finally, CP shielding assessment methods and modeling works are presented and discussed from different perspectives. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Keywords
Cathodic protection; Shielding; Buried pipelines; Buried structure; Coating professionals; Disbondment; Holistic approach; Modeling; Research gaps; Shielding factor; Transport process; Work-related; Coatings
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-68807 (URN)10.1007/s11998-023-00850-y (DOI)2-s2.0-85179330670 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-09 Created: 2024-01-09 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Tidblad, J., Kreislová, K., Faller, M., de la Fuente, D., Yates, T., Verney-Carron, A., . . . Hans, U. (2017). ICP materials trends in corrosion, soiling and air pollution (1987-2014). Materials, 10(8), Article ID 969.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ICP materials trends in corrosion, soiling and air pollution (1987-2014)
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2017 (English)In: Materials, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 969Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Results from the international cooperative programme on effects on materials including historic and cultural monuments are presented from the period 1987-2014 and include pollution data (SO2, NO2, O3, HNO3 and PM10), corrosion data (carbon steel, weathering steel, zinc, copper, aluminium and limestone) and data on the soiling of modern glass for nineteen industrial, urban and rural test sites in Europe. Both one-year and four-year corrosion data are presented. Corrosion and pollution have decreased significantly and a shift in the magnitude is generally observed around 1997: from a sharp decrease to a more modest decrease or to a constant level without any decrease. SO2 levels, carbon steel and copper corrosion have decreased even after 1997, which is more pronounced in urban areas, while corrosion of the other materials shows no decrease after 1997, when looking at one-year values. When looking at four-year values, however, there is a significant decrease after 1997 for zinc, which is not evident when looking at the one-year values. This paper also presents results on corrosion kinetics by comparison of one- and four-year values. For carbon steel and copper, kinetics is relatively independent of sites while other materials, especially zinc, show substantial variation in kinetics for the first four years, which needs to be considered when producing new and possibly improved models for corrosion. © 2017 by the authors.

Keywords
Aluminium, Atmospheric corrosion, Carbon steel, Copper, Glass, Limestone, Pollution, Soiling, Weathering steel, Zinc, Aluminum, Copper corrosion, Kinetics, Nitrogen compounds, Urban growth, Weathering, Constant level, Corrosion kinetics, Substantial variations, Test site, Urban and rural, Urban areas, Corrosion
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33177 (URN)10.3390/ma10080969 (DOI)2-s2.0-85027731282 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A. J., Lilja, C., Sjögren, L., Gordon, A., Hallbeck, L. & Johansson, L. (2017). Insights from post-test examination of three packages from the MiniCan test series of copper-cast iron canisters for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel: impact of the presence and density of bentonite clay. Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology, 52, 54-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insights from post-test examination of three packages from the MiniCan test series of copper-cast iron canisters for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel: impact of the presence and density of bentonite clay
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2017 (English)In: Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology, ISSN 1478-422X, E-ISSN 1743-2782, Vol. 52, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

MiniCan is a field test designed to highlight certain aspects of corrosion in a KBS-3 type repository for spent nuclear fuel. Five experimental packages containing miniature copper-cast iron canisters were installed in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in 2006. Three packages have been retrieved, MiniCan 3 in 2011 and MiniCan 4 and 5 in 2015. The packages were examined regarding surface chemistry, microbiology and corrosion of copper and iron. The main difference in design between the retrieved packages was the presence and density of bentonite clay. Black deposits of sulphides were visually noted during dismantling of both MiniCan 3 (low density clay) and MiniCan 5 (no clay), but not in MiniCan 4 (high density clay). Extensive corrosion of cast iron specimens was observed in all three packages, with local attacks corresponding to the loss of hundreds of µm/y. Sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were found to be present in ground water, in bentonite clay and on surfaces of various specimens of iron and copper, and it is suggested that the SRB activity had a pronounced influence on the corrosion observed. Copper surfaces display a roughness at the µm level and the integrated corrosion rate of copper mass-loss specimens was generally low. This paper is part of a supplement on the 6th International Workshop on Long-Term Prediction of Corrosion Damage in Nuclear Waste Systems. © 2017 The Author(s).

Keywords
copper corrosion, geological waste disposal, iron corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), Spent nuclear fuel, sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), Bacteria, Cast iron, Clay deposits, Copper, Corrosion, Corrosion rate, Fuels, Geology, Groundwater, Iron, Nuclear fuel cladding, Radioactive waste disposal, Radioactive wastes, Sulfur compounds, Surface chemistry, Waste disposal, Microbiologically influenced corrosions, Spent nuclear fuels, Sulphate-reducing bacteria, Bentonite
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33158 (URN)10.1080/1478422X.2017.1296224 (DOI)2-s2.0-85028771369 (Scopus ID)
Note

 Funding details: Svensk Kärnbränslehantering; Funding details: Swedish Brain Power; Funding details: Chartered Institution of Wastes Management

Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2024-05-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0009-0007-0858-6105

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