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Niimi, J., Ahlinder, A., Nilsson Pingel, T., Niimi, C., Höglund, E., Öhgren, C., . . . Nielsen, T. (2023). Saltiness enhancement: Impact of acid added to bread with heterogeneously distributed sodium chloride. Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, 176, Article ID 114557.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Saltiness enhancement: Impact of acid added to bread with heterogeneously distributed sodium chloride
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2023 (English)In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 176, article id 114557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current global sodium consumption exceeds recommended daily intakes and there is a great need to reduce the sodium content in foods for a healthier society. The current study investigated the effect of combining sensory interaction principles and heterogeneous distribution of NaCl in bread on sensory properties, structure, and NaCl distribution. Breads were prepared in three different arrangements of NaCl distribution: homogenous, layered, and layered with lactic acid. Within each arrangement, four NaCl levels were tested. The breads were evaluated by a sensory panel for perceived saltiness, sourness, and qualitative texture, measured for stiffness, and the NaCl distribution was determined by X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). Perceived saltiness was significantly enhanced in breads beyond heterogeneous NaCl distribution when lactic acid was added. Stiffness measurements were affected by layering of bread, the layers without NaCl were stiffer with an increase in overall salt concentration. The heterogeneous distribution of NaCl in layered breads could be visualised by XFM and textural consequences of layering bread are discussed. The current study demonstrates the potential of combining principles of pulsation of taste and sensory interactions together to enhance salt perception, and hence suggesting the approach as a possible further strategy for NaCl reduction in bread.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2023
Keywords
Heterogeneous salt distribution, Perception, Pulsation, Salt, Sensory interactions, Fluorescence microscopy, Food products, Lactic acid, Sensory perception, Stiffness, Textures, 'current, Heterogeneous distributions, Recommended daily intakes, Sensory panels, Sensory properties, Stiffness measurements, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, Sodium chloride
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-63980 (URN)10.1016/j.lwt.2023.114557 (DOI)2-s2.0-85147538587 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Niimi J, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden. Funding details: Västra Götalandsregionen, RUN 2020–00378; Funding details: VINNOVA, 2020–01824; Funding text 1: The measurements indicated only a little NaCl migration after baking, freezing, storage and thawing, since sharp changes in the chlorine signals were not observed, but rather a gradual transition between the layers (Fig. S6). Also, the signal did not drop to zero in the centre of the layers with no added NaCl. The amount of NaCl migration appeared to be so small that it is not expected to have a significant impact on the perceived saltiness of the breads. Additional measurements were performed using ICP-OES and IC to investigate if the migration of sodium is larger than the observed chlorine migration in the XFM measurements. The migration of sodium was similar or less to that of chlorine, which supported the conclusions drawn from the XFM results (for methodology and a summary of the ICP-OES/IC results see S2.0 and Table S2 in the supplementary material). Given that the ICP-OES/IC measurements showed that chlorine migrated in a similarly strong manner to sodium, it is reasonable to assume that the sodium distribution was adequately represented by chlorine. These measurements with XFM demonstrated its applicability in measuring chlorine ions in bread. Previous applications of XFM were on plant materials such as leaves, seedlings, barley grains, and rice kernels to measure distribution of ions such as zinc, calcium, potassium, and manganese among others. The results demonstrate that XFM can be a useful tool in confirming heterogenous distribution of chlorine ions of NaCl in processed food stuffs, such as breads.This study was performed under the project ReduSalt – Salt Reduction in Foods, a project funded by Sweden's Innovation Agency (Vinnova), grant number 2020–01824. The financial support by Region Västra Götaland, Sweden, grant number RUN 2020–00378, is also gratefully acknowledged.  Funding text 2: This study was performed under the project ReduSalt – Salt Reduction in Foods, a project funded by Sweden's Innovation Agency (Vinnova) , grant number 2020–01824 . The financial support by Region Västra Götaland, Sweden , grant number RUN 2020–00378 

Available from: 2023-02-22 Created: 2023-02-22 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Schott, F., Isaksson, S., Larsson, E., Marone, F., Öhgren, C., Röding, M., . . . Raaholt, B. (2023). Structural formation during bread baking in a combined microwave-convective oven determined by sub-second in-situ synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Food Research International, 173, Article ID 113283.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural formation during bread baking in a combined microwave-convective oven determined by sub-second in-situ synchrotron X-ray microtomography
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2023 (English)In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 173, article id 113283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new concept has been developed for characterizing the real-time evolution of the three-dimensional pore and lamella microstructure of bread during baking using synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SRµCT). A commercial, combined microwave-convective oven was modified and installed at the TOMCAT synchrotron tomography beamline at the Swiss Light Source (SLS), to capture the 3D dough-to-bread structural development in-situ at the micrometer scale with an acquisition time of 400 ms. This allowed characterization and quantitative comparison of three baking technologies: (1) convective heating, (2) microwave heating, and (3) a combination of convective and microwave heating. A workflow for automatic batchwise image processing and analysis of 3D bread structures (1530 analyzed volumes in total) was established for porosity, individual pore volume, elongation, coordination number and local wall thickness, which allowed for evaluation of the impact of baking technology on the bread structure evolution. The results showed that the porosity, mean pore volume and mean coordination number increase with time and that the mean local cell wall thickness decreases with time. Small and more isolated pores are connecting with larger and already more connected pores as function of time. Clear dependencies are established during the whole baking process between the mean pore volume and porosity, and between the mean local wall thickness and the mean coordination number. This technique opens new opportunities for understanding the mechanisms governing the structural changes during baking and discern the parameters controlling the final bread quality. © 2023 The Author(s)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Baking, Bread, Convective, Image analysis, In-situ, Microwave, Oven, Synchrotron X-ray microtomography, Food products, Light sources, Microwave heating, Porosity, Quality control, Tomography, Baking technology, Convective heating, Image-analysis, Microwave-heating, Pore volume
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-65961 (URN)10.1016/j.foodres.2023.113283 (DOI)2-s2.0-85166305869 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was funded by VINNOVA (Swedeńs Innovation Agency)[2019–02572], and additional internal RISE co-financing from 2020. Florian and Rajmund were financed by the Swedish Research Council [2019–03742]. Niklas gratefully acknowledges funding from the Swedish Research Council [2018–06378]. The computations and data handling were carried out under the following QIM-related projects: SNIC 2022/6–157 and LU 2022/2–22, which were enabled by resources provided by the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC) at LUNARC at Lund University, partially funded by the Swedish Research Council through grant agreement [2018–05973].

Available from: 2023-08-24 Created: 2023-08-24 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Ahlinder, A., Höglund, E., Öhgren, C., Miljkovic, A. & Stading, M. (2023). Towards attractive texture modified foods with increased fiber content for dysphagia via 3D printing and 3D scanning. Frontiers in Food Science and Technology, 2, Article ID 1058641.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards attractive texture modified foods with increased fiber content for dysphagia via 3D printing and 3D scanning
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Food Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2674-1121, Vol. 2, article id 1058641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As life expectancy increases so do age related problems such as swallowing disorders, dysphagia, which affects 10%–30% of people over 65 years old. For dysphagia patients the texture and rheological properties of the food, and the bolus, is critical to avoid choking and pneumonia. Texture modified foods, timbals, are often served to these patients due to their ease of swallowing. The main concern with these foods is that they do not look visually alike the food they replace, which can decrease the patient’s appetite and lead to reduced food intake and frailty. This study aims to improve both the visual appearance of texturized food as well as the energy density and fiber content of the timbal formulation. 3D scanning and additive manufacturing (3D Printing) were used to produce meals more reminiscent of original food items, increasing their visual appeal. Rheology was used to ensure the original flow profile was maintained as the timbal was reformulated by reducing starch contents and partially replacing with dietary fibers. The amount of starch was reduced from 8.7 wt% in the original formulation to 3.5 wt% and partially replaced with 3 wt% citrus fiber, while maintaining properties suitable for both swallowing and 3D printing. The resulting formulation has improved nutritional properties, while remaining suitable for constructing visually appealing meals, as demonstrated by 3Dprinting a chicken drumstick from a model generated with 3D scanning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-66381 (URN)10.3389/frfst.2022.1058641 (DOI)
Note

This study was supported by the Sweden’s Innovation Agency Vinnova.

Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Hultgren, J., Segerkvist, K. A., Berg, C., Karlsson, A. H., Öhgren, C. & Algers, B. (2022). Preslaughter stress and beef quality in relation to slaughter transport of cattle. Livestock Science, 264, Article ID 105073.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preslaughter stress and beef quality in relation to slaughter transport of cattle
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2022 (English)In: Livestock Science, ISSN 1871-1413, E-ISSN 1878-0490, Vol. 264, article id 105073Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Preslaughter handling inevitably exposes cattle to stress, which affects beef quality and yields. Short transports to the slaughterhouse or a short walk across the yard to a mobile abattoir parked on the farm may reduce stress, with potential beneficial effects on meat quality. To compare different road transport distances to a stationary (fixed) slaughterhouse, and the stationary plant with a mobile abattoir, we studied commercial slaughter of 298 cattle in each facility over a period of 13 months. For the stationary slaughterhouse, the estimated transport distance from farm to plant was 7–250 km (mean 99 km) and 96 animals spent one night in lairage there. All animals at both slaughterhouses were stunned with a captive bolt gun. Blood levels of cortisol, glucose and lactate at exsanguination and meat quality indicators were recorded. According to two-sample t-tests, thawing loss was 1 percent unit lower (p<0.0001), Warner-Bratzler shear force was 6.9 N lower (p<0.0001) and compressive load was 3.9 MPa lower (p<0.0001), but mean lactate level was 1.02 mmol/l higher (p<0.0001) and ultimate pH was 0.05 units higher (p=0.0001) in the mobile facility compared with the stationary. Effects of slaughter facility and estimated road transport distance to the stationary plant on blood lactate, ultimate meat pH, shear force and compressive load were analysed by generalized linear mixed models, with delivering farm as random effect. According to the models, predicted shear force was 23% higher at the 95th percentile of the transport distance compared with the 5th percentile (p=0.012), and there was some evidence of a similar difference in compressive load for heifers, albeit only marginally significant (39% higher at the 95th percentile; p=0.056). Predicted blood lactate was 19% higher in the mobile abattoir than the stationary slaughterhouse (p=0.046). Ultimate meat pH was higher in the mobile unit for cows and steers (p≤0.0020), and for carcasses weighing 311–380 kg (p≤0.0020). Compressive load was 27% lower in the mobile abattoir, compared to the stationary (p<0.0001), but shear force did not differ significantly between the two facilities. This study shows a negative effect of long transport distances on beef tenderness. It also provides evidence of differences in beef quality between a mobile abattoir and a stationary slaughterhouse, although these differences may be attributable to specific routines for carcass handling and ageing at the studied facilities, and not the transport and slaughter strategy itself. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V., 2022
Keywords
Compressive load, On-farm slaughter, Shear force, Stress, Tenderness
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-60257 (URN)10.1016/j.livsci.2022.105073 (DOI)2-s2.0-85138510252 (Scopus ID)
Note

Export Date: 10 October 2022; Article; Correspondence Address: Segerkvist, K.A.; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 234, Sweden; email: katarina.segerkvist@slu.se; Funding details: Marie-Claire Cronstedts Stiftelse; Funding details: Svenska Djurskyddsföreningen, SDF; Funding text 1: This work was funded through donations from Marie-Claire Cronstedt Foundation (decision 1 December, 2014) and the Swedish Association for the Protection of Animals (decision 8 December, 2015). Basen AB and Caroline Ankarcrona contributed funds to the meat analyses. The meat sampled at the mobile abattoir was paid for by the slaughter company. The authors thank the two involved slaughter companies for the possibility to carry out the project, especially the staff who assisted in various ways in connection with data collection. Research technicians Anne Larsen and Karin Wallin collected data and samples at slaughter and cutting, and provided valuable input on project implementation. Marco Berta, Marlene Svensson and Emma Bragd at the RISE Research Institutes of Sweden performed laboratory analyses of meat samples.

Available from: 2022-10-10 Created: 2022-10-10 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, J., Öhgren, C. & Stading, M. (2021). Compression of plant seeds assuming soft spheres. Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, 29, 103-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compression of plant seeds assuming soft spheres
2021 (English)In: Annual Transactions of the Nordic Rheology Society, Vol. 29, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-57526 (URN)
Available from: 2022-01-05 Created: 2022-01-05 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, E., Karlsson, A., Öhgren, C. & Arvidsson-Segerkvist, K. (2020). Carcass characteristics and meat quality attributes in lambs reared indoors, on cultivated pasture, or on semi-natural pasture. Agricultural and Food Science, 29(5), 432-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carcass characteristics and meat quality attributes in lambs reared indoors, on cultivated pasture, or on semi-natural pasture
2020 (English)In: Agricultural and Food Science, ISSN 1459-6067, E-ISSN 1795-1895, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 432-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study evaluated the effects of different lamb production systems on live weight gain (LWG), carcass quality and meat quality. Four production systems for weaned intact male lambs were examined: Indoor feeding with grass silage and concentrate (group 1), grazing on cultivated pasture with (group 2) or without (group 3) concentrate, and grazing on semi-natural pasture (group 4). Live weight, carcass weight, dressing percentage, carcass conformation, fatness and pH decline were recorded at slaughter, and M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum was analysed for colour, thawing and cooking loss, pH after 24 hours and 6 days, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. LWG was strongly affected by production system, being highest for group 1 and lowest for group 4 (p<0.001). Group 4 had the lowest conformation (p=0.002) and fat scores (p<0.001). Hence, production system affected age at slaughter, live weight gain, weight at slaughter, carcass conformation and fatness scores, but caused no differences in meat quality attributes in intact male lambs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Scientific Agricultural Society of Finland, 2020
Keywords
Colour, Intact male lamb, Live weight gain, PH, Production system, Warner-Bratzler shear force
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-51965 (URN)10.23986/afsci.91706 (DOI)2-s2.0-85099127539 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, SLU; Funding details: Interreg, 20200994; Funding details: RUN-610-0789-13; Funding text 1: We thank Jonas Dahl, David Johansson, Karin Wallin and Frida Dahlstr?m for valuable technical support, the staff at Skara lammslakteri for help during slaughter, and Mr Lennart Pettersson, farmer, for good cooperation. We are also grateful to the funding bodies Stiftelsen Svensk Fårforskning, Interreg ?KS [grant no. 20200994], Västra Götalandsregionen [grant no. RUN-610-0789-13], Agroväst and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences for base support.

Available from: 2021-01-19 Created: 2021-01-19 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Öhgren, C., Lopez-Sanchez, P. & Loren, N. (2020). Food Structure Analysis Using Light and Confocal Microscopy: Chapter 12. In: Handbook of Food Structure Development: (pp. 287-308). Royal Society of Chemistry (18)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food Structure Analysis Using Light and Confocal Microscopy: Chapter 12
2020 (English)In: Handbook of Food Structure Development, Royal Society of Chemistry , 2020, no 18, p. 287-308Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Microstructure codes for the properties of food. Processing enables the microstructure. Food microstructures are in most cases hierarchical, heterogeneous, multiphase, and complex. A full understanding of the food microstructure requires the characterization at many different length scales. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are powerful tools to image food microstructures at the micrometer level. In this chapter, the principles and use of these microscopy techniques are described. Examples of the use of light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to characterize and understand the microstructures in bread and dough, fibrous vegetable protein structures, plant cell walls, fat-rich food, and mayonnaise are discussed. In the end, an outlook on the use of light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in foods is given..

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2020
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40861 (URN)10.1039/9781788016155-00285 (DOI)2-s2.0-85075133788 (Scopus ID)9781782629221 (ISBN)9781788011273 (ISBN)9781788011785 (ISBN)9781788012164 (ISBN)
Note

Funding details: Royal Society of Chemistry, RSC; Funding text 1: Food Chemistry, Function and Analysis No. 18 Handbook of Food Structure Development Edited by Fotis Spyropoulos, Aris Lazidis and Ian T. Norton

Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Svanberg, L., Wassén, S., Gustinelli, G. & Öhgren, C. (2019). Design of microcapsules with bilberry seed oil, cold-set whey protein hydrogels and anthocyanins: Effect of pH and formulation on structure formation kinetics and resulting microstructure during purification processing and storage. Food Chemistry, 280, 146-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of microcapsules with bilberry seed oil, cold-set whey protein hydrogels and anthocyanins: Effect of pH and formulation on structure formation kinetics and resulting microstructure during purification processing and storage
2019 (English)In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 280, p. 146-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Encapsulation of polar and non-polar bioactive compounds from bilberries was achieved by designing microcapsules with bilberry seed oil (BSO) distributed in an aqueous phase of anthocyanins (AC) stabilized by whey protein isolate (WPI). Non-thermal emulsification method (o/w/o) was developed and the effect of pH (3 or 4.5), concentration of WPI (8.4–10.8% w/w), addition of AC (72–216 ppm) and emulsifier on the structure-forming kinetics, resulting microstructure during storage and after centrifugation and washing was investigated. Agglomeration of BSO was observed in all microcapsules at pH 4.5 due to slow gelling process and in samples at pH 3 at low concentrations of WPI (≤8.4%). Capsules with pH 3 (9.6–10.8% WPI) had weak structures but as the gelling process was faster, it generated an even distribution of BSO droplets. All samples at pH 4.5 and samples with WPI concentration ≥10.8% at pH 3 exhibited intact structures after centrifugation and washing.

Keywords
Anthocyanins, Bilberry seed oil, Cold gelation, Microcapsules, Whey protein isolate, Centrifugation, Emulsification, Food storage, Gelation, Microstructure, Oils and fats, pH effects, Proteins, Purification, Washing, Bioactive compounds, Emulsification methods, Gelling process, Low concentrations, Seed oil, Structure formations, anthocyanin, vegetable oil, water oil cream, whey protein, aqueous solution, Article, bilberry, chemical structure, concentration (parameters), hydrogel, kinetics, microcapsule, microencapsulation, molecular stability, pH, processing, storage
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-37008 (URN)10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.11.129 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059100423 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Svenska Forskningsrådet Formas;

Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Svanberg, L., Malmberg, K., Gustinelli, G., Öhgren, C., Persson, I., Brive, L. & Wassén, S. (2019). Effect of anthocyanins on lipid oxidation and microbial spoilage in value-added emulsions with bilberry seed oil, anthocyanins and cold set whey protein hydrogels. Food Chemistry, 272, 273-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of anthocyanins on lipid oxidation and microbial spoilage in value-added emulsions with bilberry seed oil, anthocyanins and cold set whey protein hydrogels
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2019 (English)In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 272, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this work was to explore the storage properties of a structured oil-in-water emulsion containing both water- and fat-soluble bioactive compounds from bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus L.). Bilberry seed oil (BSO) was dispersed in a continuous aqueous phase of anthocyanins (AC) and whey protein isolate. The microstructure was evaluated using light microscopy and the effect of anthocyanins on lipid oxidation and microbial growth was investigated. The results showed that it was possible to generate a stable emulsion structure that resisted phase separation during 25 weeks of storage. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry measurements of the fatty acids in the BSO during storage showed that AC had a protective effect against lipid oxidation. The AC did not have an antimicrobial effect against the investigated strains Zygosaccharomyces bailii (ATCC 42476) and Aspergillus niger (ATCC 6275 (M68)).

Keywords
Anthocyanins, Bilberry seed oil, Emulsions, Lipid oxidation, Microbial spoilage, Microstructure, Aspergillus, Emulsification, Fatty acids, Food storage, Gas chromatography, Mass spectrometry, Oils and fats, Oxidation, Phase separation, Proteins, Anti-microbial effects, Oil-in-water emulsions, Seed oil, Spectrometry measurements, Vaccinium myrtillus, Whey protein isolate, Spoilage
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-35025 (URN)10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.06.064 (DOI)2-s2.0-85051565302 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was financially supported by the ERA-Net, SUSFOOD project ‘Sustainable & Healthy: Development of sustainable processing technologies for converting by-products into healthy, added-value ingredients and food products’, Swedish Research Council Formas , Grant: 2014-49

Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
Berta, M., Koelewijn, I., Öhgren, C. & Stading, M. (2019). Effect of zein protein and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the texture of model gluten-free bread. Journal of texture studies, 50(4), 341-349
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of zein protein and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the texture of model gluten-free bread
2019 (English)In: Journal of texture studies, ISSN 0022-4901, E-ISSN 1745-4603, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence of zein protein and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on the texture and volume of gluten-free bread was investigated. The addition of HPMC to starch affected the dough viscoelasticity and it improved the bread volume during baking since it acts as an emulsifier. The addition of zein protein to gluten-free bread increased the crumb firmness and reduced the crust hardness within the range of concentrations investigated. No zein protein network could be observed in the bread crumb. The zein protein, cold mixed at low concentration, did not enhance the dough elasticity. Due to the lack of a protein network noncovalent interactions may stabilize the bubble structure stabilization within the crumb, rather than covalent links of the protein chain. With an optimized amount of zein protein and HPMC hydrocolloid, the gluten-free bread showed similar texture and staling behavior to that of model wheat bread. The optimized recipe, compiled into a spreadsheet, is available in the supporting information. The microstructural observations suggest that zein could be replaced with another protein for this recipe resulting in a similar bread texture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2019
Keywords
bread, gluten-free, HPMC, texture, zein, Emulsification, Ions, Proteins, Textures, Bubble structures, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, Low concentrations, Micro-structural observations, Non-covalent interaction, Food products
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-38503 (URN)10.1111/jtxs.12394 (DOI)2-s2.0-85064475849 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2024-03-25Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9145-4694

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