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Niimi, J., Sörensen, V., Mihnea, M., Valentin, D., Bergman, P. & Collier, E. (2023). Does cooking ability affect consumer perception and appreciation of plant-based protein in Bolognese sauces?. Food Quality and Preference, 99, Article ID 104563.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does cooking ability affect consumer perception and appreciation of plant-based protein in Bolognese sauces?
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2023 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 99, article id 104563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Encouraging consumers to reduce their meat consumption is imperative in mitigating climate change effects related to the food industry. For some, transitioning away from meat may be facilitated by meat substitutes. However, these are not always accepted as suitable alternatives to meat due to a combination of psychological, situational, and sensorial aspects. The influence of factors such as cooking ability on hedonics and sensory discrimination of meat and meat substitutes is currently under-researched. The present study investigated such effects. Consumers (N = 101) of varying cooking ability and food neophobia (measured using questionnaires) tasted and evaluated six mince products (one beef and five meat substitutes - three soybean-based, one mycoprotein-based, and one oat-based) prepared in a Bolognese sauce. They rated liking for overall, appearance, aroma, taste/flavour, and texture, and profiled the products sensorially using check-all-that-apply (CATA). It was found that meat substitutes can be liked just as much as, if not more than, beef in the application of Bolognese sauce. No main effects of cooking ability were found for any modality of liking, though an interaction between cooking ability and sample was found for liking of flavour/taste. Consumers’ ability to sensorially discriminate between the Bolognese sauces was not dependent on their cooking ability. Several attributes that contributed to (dis)liking were identified. An additional online sample (N = 288) completed only the cooking ability and food neophobia questionnaires. A negative relationship was detected between cooking ability and food neophobia for the combined consumer and online datasets (total N = 389).

Keywords
Cooking ability, food neophobia, consumers, meat substitutes, CATA, liking
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-58563 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2022.104563 (DOI)s2.0-S0950329322000386 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by a grant from FORMAS – Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, grant number 2018–01867. 

Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
Niimi, J., Hörlin, E., Oberrauter, L.-M., Sörensen, V., Norman, C., Normann, A., . . . Bergman, P. (2022). Sample discrimination through profiling with rate all that apply (RATA) using consumers is similar between home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT). Food Quality and Preference, 95, Article ID 104377.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sample discrimination through profiling with rate all that apply (RATA) using consumers is similar between home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT)
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2022 (English)In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 95, article id 104377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of testing locations, home use test (HUT) and central location test (CLT) on consumer evaluations of food products using rate all that apply (RATA) was investigated. As a case study, eight cold cuts were evaluated: four vegetarian/vegan and four meat-based products. A between-subjects design was used, whereby consumers were randomly allocated to either HUT or CLT test location (58 and 71 consumers, respectively). To retain as much similarity as possible across locations, consumers in both groups received identical bags of products with palate cleansers and instructions. Consumers evaluated the products using a lexicon consisting of 32 sensory attributes based on similar studies and benchtop tasting, using RATA with 7pt scales. A total of 30 and 31 attributes differed significantly (p < 0.05) across the products for HUT and CLT, respectively. Sample discrimination was similar between the two locations. Location significantly (p < 0.05) affected discrimination of 14 attributes, but a particular location having consistently higher attribute means was not observed. Bootstrapping of the attribute means per product showed no significant differences between the two testing locations, and multilevel regression models using Bayesian inference did not reveal marked differences in expected ratings between locations. Further comparisons of sample discrimination patterns through principal component analysis showed that the two locations were very similar, including the overlap of confidence ellipses. The between-subjects design strengthens the results: that comparable sensory profiles were obtained from different consumers in different testing locations supports the notion that RATA data from consumers can be reliably collected for relatively sensorially distinct products with minimal data compromise.

Keywords
RATA, CLT, HUT, Profiling, Consumers
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-56383 (URN)10.1016/j.foodqual.2021.104377 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0009-0009-8573-2596

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