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Hellström, Anna-KarinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8590-0520
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Andersson, K., Hellström, A.-K. & Lundahl, J. (2023). Challenges and opportunities with the EU Taxonomy Regulation– with focus on chemical safety and usage in complex products.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges and opportunities with the EU Taxonomy Regulation– with focus on chemical safety and usage in complex products
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The use of Policy Lab processes has been growing in Sweden and other countries to accelerate the adaptation of regulations to emerging technologies. Policy Lab facilitates active collaboration between relevant authorities, companies, and stakeholders through interactive and iterative methods based on Design Thinking principles. This approach bridges the gap between the legislative domain responsible for developing regulatory frameworks and the innovative companies that create solutions for emerging markets using new technologies and opportunities. In our study, we applied Policy Lab processes to the EU Taxonomy Regulation to identify challenges and opportunities related to chemical safety and usage for manufacturers of complex products. The EU Taxonomy Regulation, along with its delegated acts, represent a serious effort to establish standardized sustainability reporting within EU. However, it is still in its early stages and lacks maturity. Moreover, certain ambiguities within the regulation currently prevent a comprehensive comparison of companies due to the development of other legislations. Addressing these gaps depends on the future development of, for example, REACH. Our conclusion is that the EU Taxonomy Regulation is part of a larger “movement” that reflects the policymakers’ intentions. This intention also includes increased data sharing at a significantly different level compared to current practices. In the long run, the shift will enable authorities to access the data and develop new legislations. Our specific focus was on the objective of pollution prevention and control regarding the use and presence of hazardous substances listed in Appendix C of the EU Taxonomy Regulation. According to Appendix C, activities must not lead to the manufacture, placing on the market or use of listed substances, whether on their own, in mixture or in articles. Regarding listed substances, reference is made to existing EU legislation that regulates hazardous substances within the EU. The most challenging aspect in Appendix C is point (g), which aims to identify substances, whether alone, in mixtures, or in articles, that meet the criteria set out in Article 57 of REACH but are not yet included in the Candidate list. Our workshops, interviews, and literature review confirmed that the main challenge in meeting the criteria of Appendix C, specifically point (g) is the need to enhance transparency and traceability throughout supply chains. Overcoming these challenges requires addressing barriers, such as the lack of a harmonized regulatory framework across the value chain, the need for faster identification and restriction of hazardous substances, and the reinforcement of stronger enforcement measures. The enabling of full declaration of the hazardous properties and functions of the substances, while considering the balance between information disclosure and protecting trade secrets, would reduce the need for extensive tracking of substance of very high concern along the value chain. To improve communication along the value chain and identify data gaps while protecting trade secrets, workshop participants have proposed the use of a user-friendly interface based on traffic light scenario. This interface would serve as a filter mechanism, allowing product manufacturers to establish specific criteria for material suppliers to respond to. The objective is to enhance communication, establish criteria, and effectively identify data gaps. While the SCIP database ensures accessibility of information on articles containing substances from the Candidate List above 0.1 w/w%, it is limited to hazardous substances on that list. This means that hazardous substances not listed in the Candidate List may not be covered by the database. The EU Commission has proposed the implementation of a digital product passport to enhance information sharing about products and their supply chain, including substances of concern. Our study is conducted under the Mistra SafeChem program, where screening tools for hazard and exposure assessment of substances are currently being developed. These tools aim to provide screening data for direct decision-making based on the Defined Approach (DA). These screening tools have the potential to contribute to filling data gaps during the early design phases of complex products, particularly when screening for multiple material alternatives.

Publisher
p. 26
Series
MISTRA SafeChem ; D2.1.3
Keywords
Policy Lab; Sustainable reporting; EU Taxonomy Regulation; Complex products, Hazardous substances
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-66706 (URN)978-91-89757-98-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Ruiz-Caldas, M.-X., Apostolopoulou-Kalkavoura, V., Hellström, A.-K., Hildenbrand, J., Larsson, M., Jaworski, A., . . . Mathew, A. (2023). Citrated cellulose nanocrystals from post-consumer cotton textiles. Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 11(13), 6854-6868
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Citrated cellulose nanocrystals from post-consumer cotton textiles
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, E-ISSN 2050-7496, Vol. 11, no 13, p. 6854-6868Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We propose a new method for the extraction of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from post-consumer cotton textiles through surface functionalization followed by mechanical treatment. Cotton-based textiles were esterified using an 85 wt% solution of citric acid at 100 °C, then further fibrillated in a microfluidizer. The final product, citrated cellulose nanocrystals (CitCNCs), was a dispersion of needle-like nanoparticles with high crystallinity. Up to 78 wt% of the cotton fabric was converted to CitCNCs that exhibited higher yields and a higher surface group content than CNCs extracted through H2SO4 hydrolysis, although CitCNCs showed a broader size distribution and decreased thermal stability. Experimental data supported by DFT calculations showed that the carboxyl groups on the CitCNC surface are bonded to cellulose by mono or diester linkages. An early-stage life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed to evaluate the environmental impact of using discarded textiles as a source of cellulose and analyze the environmental performance of the production of CitCNCs. Our work showed a significant reduction in the environmental burden of CNC extraction using post-consumer cotton instead of wood pulp, making clothing a good feedstock. The environmental impact of CitCNC production was mainly dominated by citric acid. As a proof of concept, around 58 wt% of the citric acid was recovered through evaporation and subsequent crystallization, which could reduce climate impact by 40%. With this work, we introduce a catalyst-free route to valorize textiles with the extraction of CitCNCs and how conducting LCA in laboratory-scale processes might guide future development and optimization. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2023
Keywords
Cellulose, Cellulose derivatives, Cotton, Crystallinity, Environmental impact, Environmental management, Extraction, Life cycle, Nanocrystals, Pulp materials, Textile fibers, Textiles, Wood products, Broad size distribution, Cotton textiles, High crystallinity, Higher yield, Mechanical treatments, Microfluidizers, Needle-like, Post-consumer, Surface Functionalization, Surface groups, Citric acid
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64705 (URN)10.1039/d2ta09456h (DOI)2-s2.0-85150023395 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: Stiftelsen för Miljöstrategisk Forskning, 2018/11; Funding details: Technische Universität München, TUM; Funding text 1: The authors thank the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra: project Mistra SafeChem, project number 2018/11) and Formas 2021-00440 for financial support. This research was also partially sponsored by XPRES (Centre of Excellence in Production Research) - a strategic research area in Sweden. Open-access publication was funded by Stockholm University Library. The authors would like to thank Wargön Innovation for providing textile samples, Marlene Viertler from the Technical University of Munich for the acquisition of SEM images, and Dr Tamara Church for fruitful discussions. This work was part of the Academy of Finland Flagship Programme Competence Center for Materials Bioeconomy, FinnCERES.; Funding text 2: The authors thank the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra: project Mistra SafeChem, project number 2018/11) and Formas 2021-00440 for financial support. This research was also partially sponsored by XPRES (Centre of Excellence in Production Research) – a strategic research area in Sweden. Open-access publication was funded by Stockholm University Library. The authors would like to thank Wargön Innovation for providing textile samples, Marlene Viertler from the Technical University of Munich for the acquisition of SEM images, and Dr Tamara Church for fruitful discussions. This work was part of the Academy of Finland Flagship Programme Competence Center for Materials Bioeconomy, FinnCERES.

Available from: 2023-05-15 Created: 2023-05-15 Last updated: 2024-05-21Bibliographically approved
Hellström, A.-K., de la Motte, H., Syrén, M., Nordstierna, L. & Bordes, R. (2016). Enabling Textile Recycling: On/Off Dyeing. In: : . Paper presented at Materials for Tomorrow 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling Textile Recycling: On/Off Dyeing
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Develop a novel family of environmental friendly dispersant for textile coloring embedded an on/off function for closed loop recycling.

Keywords
textile recycling, dyeing, decolorization, reversibility
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-29278 (URN)
Conference
Materials for Tomorrow 2016, November 8-10, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden
Projects
Towards textiles of the future: On-Off sustainable dyeing process
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8590-0520

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