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Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Lundahl, J. (2024). Klimatanpassning av samhällsviktig verksamhet – juridiska utmaningar.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Klimatanpassning av samhällsviktig verksamhet – juridiska utmaningar
2024 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Climate adaptation of vital societal functions – a deep dive into the legal issues The climate is changing. This can lead to more frequent extreme weather events which can cause major damages in cities. Especially in larger cities, the climate related damages can go far beyond individual homeowners, as e.g. flooding can impair important societal functions. Today, many cities face the need to implement effective climate adaptation measures. But it is neither possible nor economically justifiable to secure all infrastructure in our cities against all types of climate-related risks. Cities need to prioritize their measures. They may be faced with, for example, the choice of investing in extensive and costly redevelopments or take smaller measures to only protect vital societal functions. Careful consideration of other interests, such as accessibility, is also required. There are organizational, technical, and legal challenges. The roles and responsibilities for various private and public entities, regarding climate adaptation measures, are not entirely clear. In the project “Multifunctional urban climate adaptation in collaboration” (Multifunktionell urban klimatanpassning i samverkan, MuKlis), financed by Vinnova, we explore the conditions for implementing efficient and sustainable climate adaptation of the built urban environment. The focus is on reducing vulnerability in case of cloudburst and heat waves with measures that also create other social, economic, and environmental benefits. In the project, we also explore legal challenges and possibilities for climate adaptation of vital societal functions and critical infrastructure, with a specific focus on the following questions: • If it is legally possible for a public or private actor to protect vital societal functions and critical infrastructure, even if it means an impairment for other actors in the area. • If it is legally possible for local, regional, or national government to demand that a public or private actor protect its vital societal functions and critical infrastructure. • If it is legally possible for an actor with vital societal functions to demand that another actor shall climate-proof for the benefit of its own vital societal functions and critical infrastructure. • If there are special provisions that can be applied if the vital societal functions or critical infrastructure are covered by the scope of the Protective Security Act (i.e. when the vital societal functions or critical infrastructure are also considered as security-sensitive activities).

Publisher
p. 62
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2024:14
Keywords
Cloudburst management, heatwave management, pluvial flooding, vital societal functions, city planning, climate adaptation, regulations and policies, regulatory development
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-72373 (URN)978-91-89896-59-8 (ISBN)
Funder
Vinnova, 2021-02465
Note

Denna rapport är ett resultat av ett arbete som utförts i projektet ”Multifunktionell klimat-anpassning i samverkan” (MuKlis), finansierat av Vinnova (dnr 2021-02465). Projektet har handlat om att skapa förutsättningar för en effektiv och hållbar klimatanpassning i urban miljö.

Available from: 2024-03-21 Created: 2024-03-21 Last updated: 2024-03-21Bibliographically approved
Müller, J.-H., Andersson, K., Fjällström, A. & Lundahl, J. (2024). Navigating the Future: Enhancing E-Scooter Traffic Management through Governance and Regulation.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Navigating the Future: Enhancing E-Scooter Traffic Management through Governance and Regulation
2024 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The GeoSence project, which is part of the Joint Programme Initiative (JPI) Urban Europe, aims to provide an overview of the current state of the art and showcase practical applications of geofencing. The project partners come from Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the UK and is funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme under the ERA-NET Cofound Urban Accessibility and Connectivity. Geofencing is defined as a virtual boundary in a specific geographical location, either fixed or dynamic. The GeoSence project focuses on improving urban transport by using geofencing methods for traffic planning and management. In this report, we examine the policies that support these solutions, while also identifying barriers and opportunities for smarter regulation. Our research focuses primarily on Munich, looking at issues such as parking, restricted areas, and data collection from e-scooter operators. Many European cities are struggling with problems associated with e-scooters, such as dangerous driving and inappropriate parking. In Munich, geofencing technology has been tested as a solution to address these issues and improve road safety, particularly for pedestrians. The city's main objective was to improve road safety for all road users, especially pedestrians. By reducing inappropriate parking, the city also expected to increase public acceptance of e-scooters. As a first step in dealing with this new form of mobility, the city's initial response included the creation of 30 dedicated parking zones in 2020 and 2021 and a voluntary commitment with mobility service providers to regulate this new form of mobility. By joining the GeoSence project, the city wanted to explore geofencing as a solution to the persistent road safety problems caused mainly by poorly parked e-scooters. With GeoSence, Munich was able to monitor and optimise the use of parking zones, improve parking and road safety, and prevent drunk driving. To define the case studies, the city collected data from e-scooter operators, including parking start and end times, vehicle types and GPS coordinates. This data was used to identify parking hotspots and plan further parking infrastructure, as well as to evaluate the use of existing parking infrastructure. Three different case studies were conducted to evaluate new parking policies based on geofencing. The first case study focused on parking e-scooters in 43 dedicated zones in Munich's old town. The second focused on the optimisation of parking in 30 existing zones outside the historic centre of the old town of Munich. Finally, the third case study introduced a new parking concept for the Oktoberfest events in 2022 and 2023. This temporary concept included designated zones and time-based usage restrictions. The results showed an increased concentration of e-scooters in the designated zones, improving the parking situation. Since GeoSence has demonstrated the success of the measures to improve the parking of e-scooters across the city, in November 2023 the City Council also mandated the Department of Mobility and the Department of Construction to create a citywide network of parking zones for shared micro-mobility services by 2026. This will build on the experience of the pilot concept for such parking facilities in the old town. In cooperation with mobility providers, no-parking zones of 100 metres will be set up around each parking space. The municipality is also working on a concept to manage the use of electric scooters during major events. To monitor compliance, geofencing tools will continue to collect data, while the results of GeoSence will be used to develop smart policies. The city's own MDAS project will provide dedicated monitoring data and analysis to make the implementation of the new parking zones and policies more effective. In the GeoSence project, the city of Munich combined contracts, public procurement, and regulation. The city entered into voluntary data-sharing agreements with operators, procured a data-sharing platform, and then used the data for better and smarter regulation. Better and smarter regulation is about moving away from a linear sequence of independent steps to a cycle of interlinked, mutually reinforcing steps. The idea is that regulation will be more effective and that citizens will have a better understanding of the rules and be more involved in creating new rules. We live in an ever-changing world, and with better and smarter regulation, our society will adapt more easily to new technologies. Rules also need to be future-proof and resilient, so that our society can adapt if necessary. Rules must also not hamper technological development and innovation. Better and smarter regulation also means making rules easier to understand and reducing administrative burdens for citizens and businesses. To achieve regulatory coherence and coordination, it's important for countries and cities to share their experiences. E-scooter regulations vary across the EU, with Swedish cities having the ability to regulate speed while German cities do not. Munich is leading the way in improving regulatory practices through geofencing, which helps build capacity and competence. In the case study regarding the use of e-scooters during the Oktoberfest, Munich demonstrated its dynamic and responsive regulation by adapting rules to human behaviour and using a risk-based approach. Geofencing is proving to be essential in the development of adaptive and informed regulation. Effective regulation also requires collaboration with stakeholders and the collection of robust, high-quality data. Munich's transition to evidence-based and smart regulation involved building trust with e-scooter operators and investing in a data platform. The city recognises the importance of training staff and involving stakeholders in transparent regulatory processes. Future challenges include ensuring public participation in data-driven decision-making and continuously evaluating and improving the regulatory framework. Geofencing is therefore proving to be essential in developing adaptive and informed regulation.

Publisher
p. 25
Keywords
Geofencing, better, smarter, and more intelligent regulations, traffic management, München
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-74584 (URN)978-91-89971-20-2 (ISBN)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 875022
Available from: 2024-07-03 Created: 2024-07-03 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, J. (2024). Steering the Future: An Overview of Current and Upcoming Regulations in Automated Driving: Version 0.5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Steering the Future: An Overview of Current and Upcoming Regulations in Automated Driving: Version 0.5
2024 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report provides an overview of current and upcoming legal frameworks and instruments relevant for automated vehicles (AV) and automated driving (AD). It is the first version of this overview, which will be updated every six months as long as the project ‘Network AD regulation’ runs. Next version of the overview can be expected around June 2024. In this version, legislation as of December 2023 has been considered. Laws and regulations play a vital role in the safe and efficient integration of AVs into our transportation system. They can ensure that we maximise the benefits of the new technology while minimising the downside risks and help to build public trust in the technology. Vehicles are sold on an international market and much of the traffic goes across national borders. Therefore, harmonised rules are needed, at least to some extent. A regulatory development around AD is ongoing at international level and regional level within Europe, and this has already resulted in some new regulations. More will come within the next few years. Knowledge of international and EU regulations as well as ongoing and planned regulatory initiatives that affect the development and use of AVs is important for actors in the AV space to follow. The shift towards AD is disruptive and complex, not least from a regulatory perspective. AVs need partly different requirements than previous vehicles, necessitating the development of new vehicle regulations and traffic rules. AVs must be able to interact safely with other road users (not least unprotected road users) in various traffic situations and driving conditions; anticipate and detect risks and drive with a margin of safety to prevent accidents and injuries; and follow traffic rules. (It is even likely that some traffic rules will have to be written differently than today.) ‘Vehicle regulations’ set requirements for how the vehicles should be designed and function, while ‘traffic rules’ set requirements for how road users should behave in traffic. In AD, it is the vehicle and not the driver that must follow traffic rules. This means that the AV must be designed to comply with traffic rules. This needs to be considered from a regulatory perspective. At the same time, users of AVs may need to have different traffic rules for how they should behave in relation to these vehicles. The legislator also needs to consider this.

Publisher
p. 38
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2024:6
Keywords
automated driving, autonomous driving, automated vehicles, autonomous vehicles, regulatory development, regulatory landscape
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-70526 (URN)978-91-89896-47-5 (ISBN)
Note

Sweden has 17 strategic innovation programmes funded by the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova, Formas (a research council for sustainable development) and the Swedish Energy Agency.

Available from: 2024-01-22 Created: 2024-01-22 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
Sobiech, C., Berglund, P., Lundahl, J. & Skoglund, M. (2023). An approach to link technical safety and policy aspects for system innovation in transport -The case of automated trucks. In: : . Paper presented at TRA Lisbon 2022 Conference Proceedings Transport Research Arena (TRA Lisbon 2022),14th-17th November 2022, Lisboa, Portugal (pp. 2165-2172). , 72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An approach to link technical safety and policy aspects for system innovation in transport -The case of automated trucks
2023 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes an approach to better link legal and technical perspectives when investigating how to safely operate remote assisted vehicles in mixed traffic and higher velocities. This approach is applied to prepare for automated trucks in Gothenburg, Sweden. We argue that the challenges we see for the market introduction and sustainability of such vehicles require innovation from a system perspective. Such system innovation includes different dimensions: technology/products, policy/regulations, infrastructure, behavior/values as well as business models, whereas we focus mainly on the first two perspectives here. The proposed innovations support cross border integration for the more comprehensive market introduction of automated goods transport; the approach further includes the legal/policy framework in Sweden, France and the US.

National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-71003 (URN)10.1016/j.trpro.2023.11.702 (DOI)
Conference
TRA Lisbon 2022 Conference Proceedings Transport Research Arena (TRA Lisbon 2022),14th-17th November 2022, Lisboa, Portugal
Available from: 2024-01-25 Created: 2024-01-25 Last updated: 2024-01-25Bibliographically approved
Andersson, K., Hellström, A.-K. & Lundahl, J. (2023). Challenges and opportunities with the EU Taxonomy Regulation– with focus on chemical safety and usage in complex products.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges and opportunities with the EU Taxonomy Regulation– with focus on chemical safety and usage in complex products
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The use of Policy Lab processes has been growing in Sweden and other countries to accelerate the adaptation of regulations to emerging technologies. Policy Lab facilitates active collaboration between relevant authorities, companies, and stakeholders through interactive and iterative methods based on Design Thinking principles. This approach bridges the gap between the legislative domain responsible for developing regulatory frameworks and the innovative companies that create solutions for emerging markets using new technologies and opportunities. In our study, we applied Policy Lab processes to the EU Taxonomy Regulation to identify challenges and opportunities related to chemical safety and usage for manufacturers of complex products. The EU Taxonomy Regulation, along with its delegated acts, represent a serious effort to establish standardized sustainability reporting within EU. However, it is still in its early stages and lacks maturity. Moreover, certain ambiguities within the regulation currently prevent a comprehensive comparison of companies due to the development of other legislations. Addressing these gaps depends on the future development of, for example, REACH. Our conclusion is that the EU Taxonomy Regulation is part of a larger “movement” that reflects the policymakers’ intentions. This intention also includes increased data sharing at a significantly different level compared to current practices. In the long run, the shift will enable authorities to access the data and develop new legislations. Our specific focus was on the objective of pollution prevention and control regarding the use and presence of hazardous substances listed in Appendix C of the EU Taxonomy Regulation. According to Appendix C, activities must not lead to the manufacture, placing on the market or use of listed substances, whether on their own, in mixture or in articles. Regarding listed substances, reference is made to existing EU legislation that regulates hazardous substances within the EU. The most challenging aspect in Appendix C is point (g), which aims to identify substances, whether alone, in mixtures, or in articles, that meet the criteria set out in Article 57 of REACH but are not yet included in the Candidate list. Our workshops, interviews, and literature review confirmed that the main challenge in meeting the criteria of Appendix C, specifically point (g) is the need to enhance transparency and traceability throughout supply chains. Overcoming these challenges requires addressing barriers, such as the lack of a harmonized regulatory framework across the value chain, the need for faster identification and restriction of hazardous substances, and the reinforcement of stronger enforcement measures. The enabling of full declaration of the hazardous properties and functions of the substances, while considering the balance between information disclosure and protecting trade secrets, would reduce the need for extensive tracking of substance of very high concern along the value chain. To improve communication along the value chain and identify data gaps while protecting trade secrets, workshop participants have proposed the use of a user-friendly interface based on traffic light scenario. This interface would serve as a filter mechanism, allowing product manufacturers to establish specific criteria for material suppliers to respond to. The objective is to enhance communication, establish criteria, and effectively identify data gaps. While the SCIP database ensures accessibility of information on articles containing substances from the Candidate List above 0.1 w/w%, it is limited to hazardous substances on that list. This means that hazardous substances not listed in the Candidate List may not be covered by the database. The EU Commission has proposed the implementation of a digital product passport to enhance information sharing about products and their supply chain, including substances of concern. Our study is conducted under the Mistra SafeChem program, where screening tools for hazard and exposure assessment of substances are currently being developed. These tools aim to provide screening data for direct decision-making based on the Defined Approach (DA). These screening tools have the potential to contribute to filling data gaps during the early design phases of complex products, particularly when screening for multiple material alternatives.

Publisher
p. 26
Series
MISTRA SafeChem ; D2.1.3
Keywords
Policy Lab; Sustainable reporting; EU Taxonomy Regulation; Complex products, Hazardous substances
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-66706 (URN)978-91-89757-98-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Brunklaus, B., Diener, D., Enebog, E., Hautajärvi Stenmark, H., Lundahl, J., Matteoni, M., . . . Renström, S. (2023). Den cirkulära bilen (förstudie).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den cirkulära bilen (förstudie)
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2023 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Syftet med förstudien Den cirkulära bilen var att börja bygga konkreta visioner som möjliggör att Sverige har en cirkulärt anpassad bilflotta med fossilfria och klimatneutrala transporter år 2045 och att bygga en solid bas för ett steg 2-projekt, som i sin tur kommer att ge stöd och kapacitet för aktörer att accelerera den cirkulära bilvärdekedjan. Projektet har samlat 13 parter från hela värdekedjan och gemensamt lagt grunden till vidare arbete i ett fortsättningsprojekt – en ansökan som genererat intresse från ett stort antal parter både befintliga och nytillkommande. Inom studien har startmöten och workshops genomförts där parter samlats digitalt och frågeställningar sonderats. Intervjuer har genomförts med parter där möjligheter och utmaningar med omställningen diskuterats. Studiebesök har genomförts där kunskapsdelning skett och samverkan möjliggjorts. Fysisk workshop har genomförts med samtliga parter. Här tittade man gemensamt på trender och möjliga framtidsscenarios genom hela systemet. Detta gav en bra grund för det vidare arbetet med steg 2. Förstudien har genererat stort intresse från aktörer i hela värdekedjan, skapat nya kontakter och möjligheter till samverkan och blivit uppstarten på en gemensam kunskapsresa för verklig förändring. Studien har initierat arbete brett i värdekedjan kopplat till gemensamma frågeställningar samt framtidsspaningar, vilket möjliggör gemensamt arbete för bred omställning och tydliggjort behovet av åtgärder som förflyttar hela systemet. Detta ses som en god grund för ett steg 2 projekt med förutsättningar för att förverkliga den cirkulära bilvärdekedjan.

Series
Projekt inom Cirkularitet - FFI - juni 2022
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67527 (URN)
Available from: 2023-10-12 Created: 2023-10-12 Last updated: 2024-04-02Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, J., Stenberg, S. & Faxer, A. (2023). Elsparkcyklar från ett policyperspektiv.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elsparkcyklar från ett policyperspektiv
2023 (Swedish)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Elsparkcyklar har potential att kunna bidra till positiva effekter i samhället. Men med friflytande elsparkcyklar följer också nya utmaningar. En del av dessa är relaterade till regelverk och policy.

National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67424 (URN)
Available from: 2023-09-28 Created: 2023-09-28 Last updated: 2024-06-25Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, J., Sobiech, C. & Thidevall, N. (2023). Framtidens trafikregler – Hur når vi dit?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framtidens trafikregler – Hur når vi dit?
2023 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The traffic regulations of tomorrow

Traffic regulations are traditionally analogue and paper-oriented. In the future, they need to be able to be interpreted by machines. How can we ensure exchange of reliable data on traffic regulations to support technological innovation such as advanced driver assist and autonomous driving technologies? In this report, we share our knowledge on digital traffic rules – what it is, why it matters and how we get there. The transport sector is becoming increasingly connected, digitalized, and automated. The development is taking place at a rapid pace and has the potential to improve the transport system in several areas (safety, efficiency, environmental impact and accessibility). To meet this development, we need to move towards a more digitalized road infrastructure. A digital representation of the road network is becoming increasingly important. One part of this is digital and machine-readable traffic rules. In a digital world we need data on traffic rules (what applies where). Road users, citizens, companies, and other actors in our society would benefit from such data (they get access to more and clearer regulations). Data on traffic rules also provides completely new opportunities, for example more dynamic traffic regulations, which can further contribute to positive effects for the transport system and for society. It is also a necessity for the implementa-tion of autonomous driving on public roads, since automated vehicles will need a reliable digital infrastructure. Drive Sweden Policy Lab (DSPL) targets specific cases in projects of the strategic innovation program Drive Sweden. The purpose is to explore how technology and service development relate to existing laws and regulations for new mobility services that are being developed, and to identify and overcome bottlenecks. DSPL was initiated in 2019 to support technology development projects within Drive Sweden’s portfolio that had encountered regulatory challenges. New cases (subprojects) have been added since. Project partners vary by case. The independent, state-owned research institute RISE is the coordinator. In this case (or subproject), we investigate the need for improved processes and possibly new regulations on how traffic rules are prepared, decided and published. We consider possible solutions and the consequences of different solutions. Many partners have participated in this work, and a large reference group with both private and public actors.

Publisher
p. 129
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2023:6
Keywords
policy lab, digitalization, traffic rules, automated driving, autonomous driving, intelligent speed adaption
National Category
Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-64042 (URN)978-91-89757-49-3 (ISBN)
Note

Drive Sweden är ett av 17 strategiska innovationsprogram (SIP). De strategiska innovationsprogrammen finansieras via Verket för innovationssystem (Vinnova), Forskningsrådet för miljö, areella näringar och samhällsbyggande (Formas) och Statens energimyndighet (Energimyndigheten).

Available from: 2023-02-20 Created: 2023-02-20 Last updated: 2023-04-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, K., Noreland, D., Lundahl, J. & Eriksson, A. (2023). Geostängslade BK4-transporter vid bropassager och på tjälade vägar.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geostängslade BK4-transporter vid bropassager och på tjälade vägar
2023 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Geofenced heavy trucks to protect bridges at crossings allowing higher weight on frozen roads Winter is our friend. When the road body is deep frozen it can handle more weight than during the rest of the year. However, the bridges are not affected by the cold weather, and they are therefore still vulnerable to increased loads. How can we allow increased loads on frozen roads while ensuring protection of the bridges? In this report, we share our insights from a project with the idea of using geofencing to protect the bridges. The geofencing technology ensures that the truck drives at a lower speed over the bridge and the bridge can withstand loads up to 74 tons since decreased speed reduces dynamic loads. If the road keeper can get guarantees that all heavy trucks drive at a low speed over the bridge, heavier traffic can be accommodated. This technology would of course also be beneficial to use across bridges in Europe regardless of the climate. ' The project “Frozen roads and 74 tons”, paid by the Swedish Transport Administration, consisted of three parts. One part was a pilot study during winter 22/23 demonstrating trucks from AB Volvo and Scania loaded with 74 tons using geofencing when the trucks passed over weak bridges. A speed limit, i.e. 50 km/h, was imposed in a zone around each bridge, whose coordinates were stored in the digital map accessible through the trucks’ Fleet Management System. Two different geofencing technologies were tested: on the one hand Scania’s system with “active” geofencing, where the truck was programmed to maintain the allowed speed over the bridge and calculated and implemented this itself (the driver could, however, override this by pushing the gas pedal to the floor); on the other hand AB Volvo’s system with “passive” geofencing, where the driver received a warning message when approaching the zone and would then slow down if necessary. The drivers were interviewed before and after the pilot about their experience. The results from the pilot showed that if the technology is verified, the truck will do the right thing and is on the right road network when the technology is activated. The drivers also liked geofencing. Geofences thus work in practice. The second part of the project was about quantifying the societal benefits of using geofencing. More efficient planning, control and follow-up can lower costs, reduce environmental impact, and increase traffic safety. Calculations in the project show that about 12 percent of timber transports in Norrland use frozen roads. They can benefit from the technology and if the technology is introduced, the industry would make savings of the equivalent of SEK 15 million / year and reduced energy use equivalent to 280 cubic meter diesel. At national level, this corresponds to an energy efficiency potential of 0.12 percent. The third part of the project was about policy and regulation. Can we use the current legislation, or do we need new legislation to scale the use of geofencing across bridges? How can we ensure compliance? How can we share data? How can we handle EU trade barriers? In the report, we have suggestions for policy and legislation to implement the geofencing technology to protect sensitive bridges. Our analysis shows that it is possible with today's regulations for an authority to introduce regulations on geofences. Such rules should preferably be based on functional requirements and a system of self-monitoring.

Publisher
p. 53
Series
RISE Rapport ; 2023:87
Keywords
intelligent access, abnormal vehicles, high capacity transport, geofencing, bridges, frozen roads, timber transports, forest industry, transport efficiency, policy lab, regulatory sandbox
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67467 (URN)978-91-89821-60-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-10-02 Created: 2023-10-02 Last updated: 2023-10-02Bibliographically approved
Sprei, F., Kazemzadeh, K., Faxer, A., Einarson Lindvall, E., Lundahl, J., Rosell, J., . . . Engdahl, H. (2023). How can e-scooter better contribute to a sustainable transport system?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How can e-scooter better contribute to a sustainable transport system?
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2023 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The eSPARK project examines the sustainability profile of the popular shared e-scooters through policy analysis, usage data analysis, surveys, and life cycle assessment. Policies and attempts to regulate e-scooters in Swedish and European cities are studied and discussed with stakeholders. The LCA-results suggest that factors such as how e-scooters are collected and distributed, and the total ridden kilometers have significant impact on their environmental impact. The project also suggests different methods that can support cities to predict the geographical area of the e-scooters and offers insights about how e-scooters are used in the cities. Usage data and the surveys show that they are used by active people in areas with a lot of activities, especially restaurants and clubs. Users are likely to have a driving license, to frequently use a car but also to have a monthly pass for public transport. Thus, escooters have a potential to mitigate congestion on roads and public transport but may lead to more traffic on bike infrastructure instead.

National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-67528 (URN)
Note

This project is granted by the Swedish Energy Agency (Dnr 2020-011467)

Available from: 2023-10-12 Created: 2023-10-12 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8452-0430

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